A New Story, “Creekboy,” at The Georgia Review

Ten years ago Stephen Corey, then the new head editor at The Georgia Review, took my essay “Eight Fragments from My Grandfather’s Body.” It was my first real prose publication, and, in many ways, that publication sort of made what I guess I’m calling my career. So I’m pleased as can be to have another piece appearing in the current issue of the always-asontishing The Georgia Review, my second short story, a strange, needy piece I’ve dubbed “Creekboy.” And, of course, it’s in good company, rubbing shoulders with work by Reg Saner, Gary Gildner, Robert Cording, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Andrea Hollander, and many others.

Environmental and Nature Writing

environmental-and-nature-writingFinally, as I catch up on things that passed me by in the rush of this last fall semester, I’m really excited to see that Environmental and Nature Writing: A Writer’s Guide and Anthology is now available from Bloomsbury Academic. Sean Prentiss and I worked super hard on this one, and we think it’s a great text for classes in environmental studies programs focused on writing, as well as classes in English and creative writing programs focused on nature and the environment. And the anthology is, uh, really damn good. We’ve got essays, stories, and poems from a host of the sharpest, bravest, wisest, and most diverse nature and environmental writers working today, including Camille T. Dungy, David Gessner, Jennifer Lunden, Erik Reece, David Treuer, Bonnie Jo Campbell, Alyson Hagy, Bonnie Nadzam, Lydia Peelle, Benjamin Percy, Gabrielle Calvocoressi, Nikky Finney, Juan Felipe Herrera, Major Jackson, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Natasha Trethewey, and many more.