News

A New Story, “Creekboy,” at The Georgia Review

Ten years ago Stephen Corey, then the new head editor at The Georgia Review, took my essay “Eight Fragments from My Grandfather’s Body.” It was my first real prose publication, and, in many ways, that publication sort of made what I guess I’m calling my career. So I’m pleased as can be to have another piece appearing in the current issue of the always-asontishing The Georgia Review, my second short story, a strange, needy piece I’ve dubbed “Creekboy.” And, of course, it’s in good company, rubbing shoulders with work by Reg Saner, Gary Gildner, Robert Cording, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Andrea Hollander, and many others.

When We Were Birds Lands on the Oregonian’s Summer Reads List

When We Were Birds has landed on The Oregonian’s Summer Reads List, alongside heavy hitters like Tyehimba Jess, Tracy Daugherty, Sue Monk Kidd, Alexandra Fuller, and others! Here’s a bit from the write up: “Joe Wilkins’ laconic poems run deep, producing spine-tingling evocations of the land and home and family that you’ll want to return to again and again.”

 

 

Oregon Book Awards

FullSizeRenderSo pleased to be able to say that last night When We Were Birds won the Stafford/Hall Prize in Poetry from the Oregon Book Awards. It was a lovely evening, full of wit and literature and friends, and I’m proud of the book and so thankful to the Oregon literary community, especially the great folks at Literary Arts. And a big, huge thanks to Major Jackson, a poet I so admire, for judging the award and offering such kind words about When We Were Birds.

Big News

The link is behind a paywall at Publishers Marketplace, but here are the important details: Little, Brown just bought my novel! And the next one after that!

“National Magazine Award finalist and Pushcart Prize winner Joe Wilkins’s debut AND EVER THESE BULL MOUNTAINS, a story set in the rugged and unforgiving landscape of eastern Montana, about the unbreakable bond between a young ranch hand named Wendell and an abandoned boy named Rowdy who is delivered into his care, a love that is tested when they find themselves on the wrong side of a militant fringe group and Wendell must protect the boy while trying to avoid the violent fate that claimed his father, in addition to a second untitled novel chronicling a murder that tears apart a boom-and-bust town in 1920s Montana, to Ben George at Little, Brown, by Sally Wofford-Girand at Union Literary (World).”