You write a novel…

FBDWID Cover…and you think it’s good. You do. And even after your agent has said it’s good, and after a great publishing house has grabbed it, and your amazing editor at said publishing house  works with you on it and says now it’s ready–well, you still think it’s good, but, the thing is, you’re not quite sure. At least until the amazing Pam Houston says so.

Oh, wow. Reveling in these words:

“With passion matched only by his compassion, Joe Wilkins has crafted a novel that perfectly explicates the clash between the cowboys and ranchers of the old west and the environmentalists and seekers of the new. No polemic, Fall Back Down When I Die is populated by vibrant characters drawn with fairness and deep heart, boys and men, girls and women who will get under your skin and stay there, and vivid descriptions of the Montana landscape that are spot on and swoon-worthy. Finally, this is book about America, its violence, its traumas, its entitlements and its stultifying rage.” -Pam Houston, best-selling author of Cowboys Are My Weakness and Deep Creek

 

Good words from Nickolas Butler on Fall Back Down When I Die

FBDWID CoverSlowly collecting good words on Fall Back Down When I Die, and, wow, just got this from one of my favorite novelists, Nickolas Butler:

“A masterpiece. Lean and authentic, this twenty-first century western captures what so many rural Americans on the margins are feeling; righteous anger and bitter disconnection, powerlessness and rugged pride. And yet, Wilkins has endowed his unforgettable cast of characters with humanity, gentleness, grace, and hard-won poetry. In prose as rugged and beautiful as the story’s Montana setting, Joe Wilkins has written one of the better novels I’ve read in years. An absolutely stunning book in every way.” – Nickolas Butler, internationally best-selling author of Shotgun Lovesongs and The Hearts of Men.

A New Story, “Creekboy,” at The Georgia Review

Ten years ago Stephen Corey, then the new head editor at The Georgia Review, took my essay “Eight Fragments from My Grandfather’s Body.” It was my first real prose publication, and, in many ways, that publication sort of made what I guess I’m calling my career. So I’m pleased as can be to have another piece appearing in the current issue of the always-asontishing The Georgia Review, my second short story, a strange, needy piece I’ve dubbed “Creekboy.” And, of course, it’s in good company, rubbing shoulders with work by Reg Saner, Gary Gildner, Robert Cording, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Andrea Hollander, and many others.

Big News

The link is behind a paywall at Publishers Marketplace, but here are the important details: Little, Brown just bought my novel! And the next one after that!

“National Magazine Award finalist and Pushcart Prize winner Joe Wilkins’s debut AND EVER THESE BULL MOUNTAINS, a story set in the rugged and unforgiving landscape of eastern Montana, about the unbreakable bond between a young ranch hand named Wendell and an abandoned boy named Rowdy who is delivered into his care, a love that is tested when they find themselves on the wrong side of a militant fringe group and Wendell must protect the boy while trying to avoid the violent fate that claimed his father, in addition to a second untitled novel chronicling a murder that tears apart a boom-and-bust town in 1920s Montana, to Ben George at Little, Brown, by Sally Wofford-Girand at Union Literary (World).”